Category: Social Media

Social Media

The Best Times to Post on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn & Other Social Media Sites [Infographic]

As an ophthalmologist, you recognize the power of social media to grow your brand, spread your message, and attract new patients to your practice.

But social media marketing for ophthalmology can be hard. It’s not enough to just create content and post it whenever it “feels right” – some times are better than others.

So what’s the best time to post on social media?

Unfortunately, there’s no perfect answer. Patients browse different platforms at different times (and for different reasons). Good post timing depends on the platform you’re using, the message you want to send, how your target audience uses the platform to engage with brands like yours, and other marketing goals.

However, there is lots of data out there on the “best” times to post on various social media platforms. The infographic below combines data from more than a dozen studies to show the best times for your practice to post on social media.

Bookmark this post as a go-to set of guidelines, and refer to it next time you need to find the optimal posting times for your ophthalmic practice.

Crawford Ifland, CEO at Messenger Healthcare Marketing

Crawford Ifland is the CEO of Messenger Healthcare Marketing. Messenger is a digital marketing agency specializing in custom healthcare website design, healthcare SEO, promotional videos, and more. Messenger gives the nation’s leading physicians and healthcare organizations the tools they need to grow their organizations.

Medical Practice Marketing Social Media

Strategies for Writing Better Titles & Headlines [Infographic]

If you’re blogging as an ophthalmologist (hint: you should be), here’s a question for you: how much time do you spend developing your title?

If you’re like most, the answer is probably, “not much.” Most likely, you spend a minute or two tweaking your headline just before pressing “publish,” without experimenting or consulting with anyone else.

But one important way to get more people to read your blog posts is by writing effective titles and headlines. With the help of this infographic, we’ll show you just how important a good title is to your ophthalmic content marketing. See below to learn which words drive people to click on your content, engage with it, and convert into leads and customers.

To learn more about content marketing for ophthalmology, contact us for a free practice website report.

Crawford Ifland, CEO at Messenger Healthcare Marketing

Crawford Ifland is the CEO of Messenger Healthcare Marketing. Messenger is a digital marketing agency specializing in custom healthcare website design, healthcare SEO, promotional videos, and more. Messenger gives the nation’s leading physicians and healthcare organizations the tools they need to grow their organizations.

Medical Practice Marketing Social Media

Facebook’s News Feed is Changing. What Does it Mean for Your Practice?

Earlier this week, Facebook announced a set of changes to its News Feed that would increasingly prioritize content shared by family and friends and show users less content from brands and news organizations.

It’s largely a response to allegations of Russian influence in the 2016 election, as well as implications that using the social network was worsening people’s mental health and well-being. Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg has taken it on as his New Year’s Challenge, and he’s already making swift changes to turn the social networking giant into a force for good.

But if your practice has a Facebook Page (here’s why you should), what do these changes mean for your practice and the social content you’re sharing?
Interesting Stories are Key
Facebook has publicly stated that it will prioritize stories that have lots of engagement among people, so sharing interesting stories is key moving forward. True, Facebook will prioritize those stories that are shared by people, not pages, but we believe that tagging people in the items you post should help you gain more exposure. Remember, Facebook isn’t eliminating posts from pages like yours that your patients have liked – it’s just changing its algorithms to ensure that the best stories rise to the top.
Facebook Advertising Isn’t Dead – Or Dying
98% of Facebook’s revenue comes from the ads it sells on its platforms, so it wouldn’t be making this News Feed change if that number would take a significant hit.

And while it’s stock has taken a 4% hit today, it won’t be battered forever. As much as Zuckerberg thinks the network needs to be changed, he has quite a lot of skin in the game, and he would lose his job is he didn’t do what was right by the shareholders. Facebook wouldn’t be making this move if it would take a sever hit on revenue. So don’t worry – your paid advertisements and post promotions should be just fine.

That said, these changes may affect the amount of money you spend on Facebook promotions as an element of your overall marketing mix (or where you spend it within the network), but time will tell. We’ll just have to wait and see.
Focus on Patient Experience and You’ll Be Fine
For you to get the most exposure going forward, we suggest sharing stories of patients and their experiences at your practice. These life-changing stories are more likely to get more post engagement, and therefore are more likely to be shared and appear in more people’s News Feeds.

Take the following patient story, for example:

I can see! I’m so thankful for @GaryWortz & @LASIKLexington for taking such amazing care of my eyes. Love supporting friends & businesses in my district. Bring on the ❄️ I can see the flakes now! pic.twitter.com/tiqw9nTL7e
— Amanda Mays Bledsoe (@AmandaMBledsoe) January 12, 2018

(This one is on Twitter, but you get the idea). Sharing patient stories and focusing on patient experience goes so much farther than just self-promotion on Facebook. In fact, always keeping patient experience at the forefront of every part of your digital marketing is always a good idea.

 

So, is Facebook going away? Definitely not. Will advertising dollars be wasted on Facebook? Not a chance.

The News Feed changes Facebook announced this week may have implications for your social media marketing strategy, but using these recommendations should help give your ophthalmic practice the best chance of success when it comes to social media.

Crawford Ifland, CEO at Messenger Healthcare Marketing

Crawford Ifland is the CEO of Messenger Healthcare Marketing. Messenger is a digital marketing agency specializing in custom healthcare website design, healthcare SEO, promotional videos, and more. Messenger gives the nation’s leading physicians and healthcare organizations the tools they need to grow their organizations.

Medical Practice Marketing Patient Experience Social Media

How to Reach an Aging Cataract Population

For any marketing manager to be able to effectively promote their practice’s services, they must first start with the target demographic they are trying to sell to: where do they spend their time? What sorts of advertisements do they respond to? What techniques and strategies can be used to attract them to your practice?

For many marketing managers, the desired service is cataract surgery, and the target market is the older generations. Assessing patient demographics is an essential element of crafting a good marketing plan. But how can ophthalmologists reach an aging cataract population?

Well, the demographics that make up much of the cataract market are increasingly turning to the Internet for new information, and represent largely-untapped potential.
Get on Facebook
Recent studies and trends are showing that many younger generations are moving towards more media-rich applications like Snapchat and Instagram in particular for their social media activities, but the older generations are deeply devoted to Facebook.

Facebook has become the tool of choice for many in the older generations; there are relatively few who actively engage on Twitter, and only a handful on Instagram. What’s more, as social media use is turning into a daily occurrence for many Baby Boomers and their parents, targeting this demographic is becoming much easier.

For your practice to capitalize on the opportunity that the aging cataract population represents, you need to be on Facebook, actively posting and engaging with the older generation.
Trust is Key
For many in older generations, booking an appointment or submitting personal information over the Internet is a foreign concept and one that is (understandably) met with resistance. Because of this implicit distrust of many activities online, it’s important to frame your marketing messages accordingly.

Consider encouraging potential cataract patients to pick up the phone to schedule an appointment (something they will likely be more comfortable with), and save the online appointment scheduling for the younger folks who need LASIK.
Video is a Winner
Not only are older generations engaging more with brands and other people on Facebook, but they’re watching more video, too. As a social network, Facebook is becoming more centered around video: experts estimate that in the near future, Facebook feeds will be comprised of mostly video content.

Combine this with the fact that Facebook is the social network of choice for many in the demographic that is prime for cataract surgery, and the opportunity couldn’t be more clear: the ophthalmic practices that utilize educational videos targeted to the cataract demographic and share them on Facebook will win.
Don’t Forget Accessibility
As we’ve mentioned, the older generations can be somewhat distrustful of content and offers they see online, but even more so if the tools are hard to use. If having your practice’s phone number prominently displayed in a marketing message is key, having a website that is accessible is even more important.

For those patients who do click through to your website to learn more about cataract surgery or to claim an offer, they will be expecting that information is easy to locate and simple to access. Having features on your website like click-to-call functionality, prominent contact information, and readable fonts can go a long way in converting a cataract lead to an actual patient.
A Final Thought
Even the most accessible, educational, and targeted marketing message will fall short if there isn’t an element of human connection present as well. As seniors are growing more technologically-savvy and engaging with new types of content in new ways, human touch is what will seal the deal. Having compassionate staff who can walk older generations through the would-be scary process of cataract surgery can make all the difference for your practice.

At the end of the day, a marketing message will fall on deaf ears if it’s not accompanied by an authentic human touch that can assuage their patients’ fears and help guide them through the process. While these tips and tricks can prove useful to reach an aging cataract population, the “special sauce” is how they are combined with the marketing strategies your practice is already employing.

Need some help with your marketing? Let’s talk.

Crawford Ifland, CEO at Messenger Healthcare Marketing

Crawford Ifland is the CEO of Messenger Healthcare Marketing. Messenger is a digital marketing agency specializing in custom healthcare website design, healthcare SEO, promotional videos, and more. Messenger gives the nation’s leading physicians and healthcare organizations the tools they need to grow their organizations.

Medical Practice Marketing Social Media

The Psychology of Why We Share Things Online

The Internet is inherently social – from Facebook posts and Tweetstorms to viral YouTube videos and those articles your mom keeps emailing you, we all love sharing.

But why do we share the content we discover, read, and watch online? What compels us to click that share button and spam all of our friends and co-workers with what we just found? Are we really hoping that funny cat image we found will go viral and we’ll be the next ________________ (fill in the blank)? Or is sharing something that’s hard-wired into us?

In this post, we’ll explore the psychology of why we share content online, why it matters, and how you can use these psychological principles to your advantage when marketing your practice.
We Share to Process
Online sharing is having an impact on how we process and manage information. According to a 2011 New York Times Customer Insight Report, three in four (73%) report that they process information more deeply, thoroughly, and thoughtfully as a result of sharing it with others.

Further, four in five (85%) say that the responses they get to shared content help them to understand and process the information more thoroughly.

These numbers show that a good number of people share content to process it and get the opinions of those around them; however, different people share content for vastly different reasons:
5 Types of “Sharers”
Altruists:
These people are primarily motivated by a sense of duty to bring valuable content to those around them, to let them know that they care. Altruists are also motivated by a desire to get the word out about causes – and brands – they believe in. While this group is less motivated by self-interest, they still likely to know that what they share was received and appreciated.
Careerists:
Focused on developing a strong network of personal and professional contacts, Careerists like to bring content and people together in ways that are actionable (and they enjoy getting credit for doing so). They share to create discussion and debate and to elicit useful recommendations.
Boomerangs:
Motivated primarily by the reaction they get back from sharing, Boomerangs like to stir the pot, start a debate and generate a lot of comments and “likes.” For Boomerangs, a negative response is better than no response at all.
Connectors:
Sharing for Connectors is about mutual experiences and staying connected. For Connectors, sharing is not just about distributing content, it is about including others in a shared, content-based experience. Connectors share things that will bring them together in person, such as coupons for shopping or restaurants, and they like to share to create new connections with like-minded people.
Selectives:
This segment shares information that they feel will be of value to a particular person, and only if they think the recipient would not have found it on her own. Given the time and consideration invested in what they share, Selectives expect that the recipient will respond and express their appreciation for the content they have found.

Not only are there different types of sharers, but there are 5 primary reasons why people share content:

To bring valuable, enlightening, and entertaining content into the lives of people they care about.
To define themselves.
To grow and nourish their relationships.
Self-fulfillment.
To get the word out about causes they believe in.

Emotions Affect Decisions
We intuitively understand that emotions affect our behavior, even if emotions have nothing to do with the issue at hand. (How many times have you waited until your spouse or significant other was in a really good mood to tell them about that speeding ticket you just got?)

Jonah Berger, the Joseph G. Campbell Jr. Assistant Professor of Marketing at the University of Pennsylvania suggests that feeling fearful, angry, or amused drives people to share news and information.

In The Upside of Irrationality, psychologist Dan Ariely sets out to explore this concept further. He began by showing subjects either an annoying or amusing video, and then asking them to write about a similar experience in their own life. The subjects then participated in a variant of the Ultimatum Game in which they had to accept or reject an offer.

The somewhat unfair split ($7.50/$2.50) was much more likely to be rejected by the annoyed/angry participants than the happier ones. The offer was the same, but the emotional carryover from the video and writing exercise markedly altered their behavior on the unrelated money decision.

But what’s most surprising is the reaction of the participants after the emotions had dissipated: despite the absence of the emotional stimulus, the subjects behaved consistently with their previous decision, suggesting that the behavior first triggered by the irrelevant emotion had itself become internalized.
To Share is Human
When consumers encounter great content – useful, enlightening or simply entertaining – they feel an instinctive need to share it:

Two in three (65%) report that when they find valuable information, they have to share it.
Three in five (58%) say it would be difficult to stop sharing information online.
Indeed, the very act of learning and discovering information is inseparable from sharing it, as three in four (76%) say that sharing is half the fun of finding information.

So, while technology has enabled consumers to share more content with more people more often, the compulsion to share and the enjoyment of sharing are important parts of our lives.
Why It Matters for You
Emotion and the nature of a piece of content can deeply influence the reasons it is shared, the way in which it is shared, and the types of people that share it.

In order to make the most of your marketing by incentivizing people to share your content, consider the following principles:
Embrace Connection
Appeal to customers’ motivations to connect with each other – not just with your brand. Even though you’re representing a business, embracing the human connection communicates a more authentic story that is more likely to resonate with your audience and get shared by them.
Trust is essential
If people don’t trust your brand, they will be less likely to share your story. Don’t try to con anyone into sharing your content – simply offer value and let them decide for themselves whether to share or not.
Keep it simple
The simplest, most authentic stories win. Don’t try to overcomplicate things by telling too complex of a story – the best stories tell themselves.
Appeal to consumers’ sense of humor
A funny piece of content has a much higher chance of being shared, as it influences our emotions and gets us in a sharing mood.
So now that you’re educated about the psychology of sharing, fire up Twitter and…
Just kidding. Only share this post if you want to 🙂

Crawford Ifland, CEO at Messenger Healthcare Marketing

Crawford Ifland is the CEO of Messenger Healthcare Marketing. Messenger is a digital marketing agency specializing in custom healthcare website design, healthcare SEO, promotional videos, and more. Messenger gives the nation’s leading physicians and healthcare organizations the tools they need to grow their organizations.

Medical Practice Marketing Social Media

4 Strategies to Attract New Patients with Social Media

The first thing ophthalmologists need to know about social media is that it’s not just social.  The fact is that the majority of users on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter go to those sites to find information about businesses and the products and services they offer. For example, 73% of the 1.13 billion active daily users of Facebook go there “for professional purposes,” and 63% of Twitter users say they use that platform to find news and events outside of the social arena.

Marketers for businesses as diverse as manufacturing, software as a service (SaaS), consulting — and medical — are increasingly embracing social media to grow their companies. For example, 66% of marketers in a recent survey from Hubspot saw a substantial increase in leads for their businesses by spending as little as 6 hours a week on social media, and 90% say using social media has increased exposure and visibility for their businesses.
Get our Free eBook: How to Monitor Social Media in 10 Minutes a Day
The question, then, is not whether using social media can grow a business, but rather how best to do it.
How One Pediatrician Found New Patients on Social Media
When pediatrician Dr. Natasha Burgert launched a Facebook page and Twitter account, her intention was simply to share relevant health information to help the existing patients in her Kansas City, MO practice.  She quickly learned that her social media posts provided an ancillary benefit: new patients.

Today, posting blogs on subjects like HPV prevention and the role of vaccinations, Dr. Burgert has garnered some 8,000 Twitter followers and more than 1,400 “likes” for her practice’s Facebook page.  As she explains:

““I use social media to share health information.  My goal is help our kids in Kansas City make good health decisions. As a consequence to that, I think that patients and families in our community are very interested in what we do here, and we certainly get new patients to our practice because of our social media efforts.””
— Dr. Natasha Burgert
How Ophthalmologists Can Attract New Patients with Social Media
Although every practice is different, there are some common sense rules of engagement which will help all medical practices attract new patients.  Here are 4 strategies to attract new patients for your ophthalmology practice:
1. Have clearly articulated goals
You have to begin by deciding what you want to achieve with social media.  Do you want to attract new patients, or is your goal strictly educational? If you do want to target patients, who are you going after? Is your sweet spot the LASIK market, or are cataract and refractive surgeries your bread and butter?
Your goals will dictate the kinds of content you post and the nature of any calls to action within those posts.

2. Keep your content current and relevant

You need to assume a patient-centric point of view in the content you post. What are your current patients’ major concerns and questions?  If you don’t know, you should take the time to ask them, and post blogs on those topics on social media.
You can also use social media tools, like Facebook’s Audience Insights to identify the most frequently asked questions by any target audience.  You can answer those questions to establish authority, and provide links to your website.
Finally, it’s a good idea to stay on top of the latest developments in ophthalmology by scanning press releases of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and other industry publications if you don’t already.

3. Keep your posts positive and professional
Don’t make the mistake of being overly colloquial or chummy – prospective patients want to have confidence in your abilities. There’s nothing wrong with being occasionally lighthearted, but in general, you should maintain a professional tone and a relentlessly positive attitude.
Seeking to educate patients and provide tremendous value is the name of the game. It’s ok if you do so in an informal manner (nobody likes a boring person), but remember, you have your professional reputation to think about, and patients are placing extreme trust in you as their surgeon…so make sure your practice’s social media stays positive and professional, just like you.

4. Be responsive

Visitors to social media sites use those platforms to initiate conversations.  That means the content you post will generate questions and, at times, complaints. In fact, nearly 72% of patients who complain on Twitter expect a response from the company within an hour!
Be sure to visit your social media pages daily. When patients or prospective patients ask questions, answer them, quickly, succinctly and authoritatively.  When they complain, take their concerns seriously and address them professionally.

What’s Next?
Identifying and attracting new patients are critical to the success of your ophthalmic practice.

Social media offer the opportunity to find and influence those new patients as you demonstrate your competence and authority.  By articulating your key goals, educating with relevant content and being responsive to questions and concerns, you can build trust in your abilities and gain immeasurably in new and loyal patients.
Need help? Get our eBook, How to Monitor Social Media in 10 Minutes a Day for free!

Crawford Ifland, CEO at Messenger Healthcare Marketing

Crawford Ifland is the CEO of Messenger Healthcare Marketing. Messenger is a digital marketing agency specializing in custom healthcare website design, healthcare SEO, promotional videos, and more. Messenger gives the nation’s leading physicians and healthcare organizations the tools they need to grow their organizations.

Medical Practice Marketing Social Media

I’m an Ophthalmologist. What Types of Content Should I Post Online?

“I’m an ophthalmologist, but I’m a little lost on how to use the Internet to the advantage of my practice. What types of content should I post online to get the most out of the investment I’ve made in my website and social media?”
If you’ve ever asked yourself (or anyone else) this question, rest assured that you’re not alone. We get it all the time – and it’s not just from ophthalmologists. We’ve heard it from optometrists, biotech engineers, family practice physicians, and many others.

So if you’re a little lost when it comes to what you should post on your website, blog, or social media channels, here are some ideas for starters:
Educational Content

About different diseases of the eye
About different surgeries to treat these diseases
Common misconceptions people have about eye surgery (and more importantly, what’s true about them)
Common misconceptions people have about the ophthalmic profession

Behind the Scenes Content

Biographical content about you and the other physicians in your practice
Fun facts about your office staff
Behind the scenes in your office
“Out of the Office” content – remind your patients that you’re a normal person just like them!

Promotional Content

A promotional video, if you have one
Quick, helpful links to your website
Promotions, discounts, and offers your practice may be running
Online trivia and polls on Twitter

Sharing Others’ Content
It’s also important to remember to share others’ content, not just to post your own. Sharing content from a variety of sources is a valuable tactic to increase engagement among your followers and the original author and their followers.
A few more tips for posting content online:

Share a variety of content. We’ve all seen the Twitter accounts that have “automated” their posts…and only post the same photo OVER AND OVER AND OVER AGAIN. Don’t be like them – spice it up! Try to choose a mix of different types of content to engage with patients in different ways.
Remember your audience. If you’re going to be targeting other physicians with your posts, a little more technical content is ok…but if your primary audience is potential patients who are interested in your services, keep the content you post accessible for everyone.
Use a service like Buffer to make your life easier. Buffer uses analytics to select the optimal times to post your content for the best changes of higher engagement. You can connect multiple social media accounts and schedule tweets, posts, and the like so that you can post on your own terms and don’t have to constantly be checking social media.
Above all else, focus on providing value. The most engaged followers and the best business leads will only come from social media if you are constantly offering value at every turn…and asking for very little in return. The time will come when you can ask your followers for something in return (like subscribing to your newsletter or clicking on a link to your website), but don’t get caught up in that – just focus on providing value.

Crawford Ifland, CEO at Messenger Healthcare Marketing

Crawford Ifland is the CEO of Messenger Healthcare Marketing. Messenger is a digital marketing agency specializing in custom healthcare website design, healthcare SEO, promotional videos, and more. Messenger gives the nation’s leading physicians and healthcare organizations the tools they need to grow their organizations.

Social Media

The Biggest Lie about Social Media

Let’s face it: social media has much of the ophthalmology world confused.

At first glance it might seem like an embarrassing thing to admit, but it’s really not. So many ophthalmologists have personal profiles on popular social media sites like Facebook and Twitter, but they still haven’t yet found a way to integrate these channels into their practice and clinical work.

So what’s the biggest lie about social media? That it doesn’t matter.

We hear it all the time: why should I have social media channels for my practice? Do people really engage with their eye doctors online?

For some reason, ophthalmologists have been tricked into thinking that social media doesn’t matter for their practice. This could be because they’ve seen others try it and fail. It could be because of the ever-present fear of HIPAA compliance. It could be that they don’t understand how much time needs to go into running a successful social media channel, or they may not know where to start.

Whatever the reason, it’s a huge lie that social media doesn’t matter for the medical industry…and it’s one we want to fight. Social media is useful for ophthalmologists for a number of reasons. Here are a three of the most important ones:
Social media expands your reach and can help draw new patients in.
Google and other big search engines often highlight profiles from social media websites like Facebook and Twitter above regular websites, so having active social media channels is a great way to expand your reach online beyond just your website. Also, having links to your social media channels on your website and vice versa (cross-linking) is a boon to your SEO, which increases the chances that your website or social media profile – or both – will be discovered.
Social media helps engage with potential patients.
Sure, it may seem like many patients may not interact with their eye doctor online – and the vast majority may not. But don’t fret – some still do! Especially if your website may not be as visible, social media channels are a great way for potential patients to get in touch, book an appointment, or learn more about your practice.
Social media is a great tool for communicating with other ophthalmologists and staying up-to-date with industry news and events.
From our experience, this is the element of social media that ophthalmologists tend to understand the most. Though patients may use social media to discover and engage with you or your practice, this is the primary reason physicians should be on social media. Ophthalmic conferences like AAO, AECOS, and ASCRS will most often use a hashtag to categorize information surrounding the conference, which can be a great way to listen in on the action even if you can’t attend. Following other ophthalmologists in your area and around the world can be a wonderful way to discover new talent, stay up-to-date with industry happenings, and promote collaboration among physicians.

Social media may not be for everyone, but it’s an absolute lie that it doesn’t matter. It is only when ophthalmologists try their hand at social media tools that they can discover how much these platforms really matter for discovering, connecting, and collaborating online.

Crawford Ifland, CEO at Messenger Healthcare Marketing

Crawford Ifland is the CEO of Messenger Healthcare Marketing. Messenger is a digital marketing agency specializing in custom healthcare website design, healthcare SEO, promotional videos, and more. Messenger gives the nation’s leading physicians and healthcare organizations the tools they need to grow their organizations.

Social Media

Use LinkedIn Like an Influencer

LinkedIn: The de-facto standard for connecting with other industry professionals
LinkedIn is a popular tool in the professional world, used to connect professionally online, post one’s resume and professional accomplishments, and seek out new job opportunities. But how can medical professionals use the popular professional networking tool to advance their careers?

Well, doctors are just like anybody else – they switch jobs from time to time. The world (and the job opportunities for the educated in within it) is a wide open space, with plenty of opportunities for advancement, should it make sense.

Our grandfathers’ model was to graduate high school, go to work for one company, and pick up a gold watch after 50 years of service. But more and more, that model is dying – employers are used to a certain level of transience as employees seek positions elsewhere. Studies have shown that this year’s college graduate will have, on average, a total of seven different careers during their working life.

While a graduate from medical school is likely to stay in their field (I seriously doubt that you as an ophthalmologist are going to quit your job and go work in human resources somewhere), they may still switch practices from time to time, or even venture out on their own.

That’s where LinkedIn can be incredibly useful…but only if it is utilized well. So, what is it useful for, and how can you leverage all the platform has to offer?
Useful for job updates
LinkedIn is built around one’s resume, and because of the changing landscape of the job market, updates to one’s resume are quite common. Building upon elements made popular by social networks such as Facebook and Twitter, LinkedIn allows for audiences (your “connections”) to see updates made to your resume, including new jobs, honors, publications, and items you choose to share, whether published works or interesting articles.

Especially in the professional world, it is surprising how much engagement LinkedIn posts see, and also surprising how many people see them. The most important thing a physician can do when publishing new research, changing jobs, or receiving awards is to publish them on LinkedIn – it educates your connections and informs them that you are on the move.
Useful to look for other jobs
LinkedIn is obviously useful for more than just sharing your resume – it is also an incredibly useful tool to look for other jobs and find connections who can assist in your search. Your connections are crucial here, as they are your ticket to getting introductions to people who may be able to help you find – or even offer you – a job.

If you are looking for a specialized position or a job within a certain practice, use the “Companies” feature on LinkedIn – there you can see how you are connected to that company, and ask for an introduction if you would like one.
Connecting on LinkedIn
There are lots of differing philosophies on LinkedIn connections, and its of different personalities that you’ll find on the network. They range from only connecting with those whom I know in real life and would feel comfortable asking for a favor or introduction (my own philosophy when using the network on a personal level) to the “I’m-going-to-connect-and-serially-network-with-everyone-I-meet” approach. Both are equally acceptable and equally useful in different scenarios – it all depends on what you use the network for.
Posts are often useful for longer content, like blog posts
When posting on LinkedIn, don’t be shy – feel free to post longer-form content, articles, scholarly work, and the like, but be careful to not post too much. Once a day, up to 3-4 times per week will often do the trick – posting too much more can make your connections a bit weary of what you have to say.
Industry and professional associations on LinkedIn are incredibly useful
One of the most useful (and underutilized) features of LinkedIn is that of industry and professional associations. They are featured at the bottom of one’s profile, so they don’t receive as much attention, but they are a valuable way of showing what professional and industry associations one belongs to and what they are involved in outside of their 9-5.

Overall, LinkedIn is a useful tool that has garnered much attention in professional settings but still remains relatively dormant in the medical world. The network represents a sizable opportunity for doctors to connect online, post their professional accomplishments, network, and look for opportunities should the need arise.

Crawford Ifland, CEO at Messenger Healthcare Marketing

Crawford Ifland is the CEO of Messenger Healthcare Marketing. Messenger is a digital marketing agency specializing in custom healthcare website design, healthcare SEO, promotional videos, and more. Messenger gives the nation’s leading physicians and healthcare organizations the tools they need to grow their organizations.

Ready to grow?

Get a free Healthcare SEO Audit to see how your practice ranks on Google and uncover opportunities for growth.

Crawford Ifland, CEO at Messenger Healthcare Marketing

Crawford Ifland is the CEO of Messenger Healthcare Marketing. Messenger is a digital marketing agency specializing in custom healthcare website design, healthcare SEO, promotional videos, and more. Messenger gives the nation’s leading physicians and healthcare organizations the tools they need to grow their organizations.